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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/10902

Title: The Impact of Leadership Style on the Fulfilment of the Psychological Contract, Specifically Motivation, Employee Engagement and Commitment, in a Manufacturing Context
Authors: Mahon, Elaine
Award date: 2011
Abstract: A cross-sectional between-participants correlational design, this study investigated four hypotheses on the production line staff of a large manufacturing company: transformational leadership style would be significantly related to psychological contract fulfilment; psychological contract fulfilment would be significantly related to levels of engagement, commitment and motivation; leadership style would be significantly related to engagement, commitment and motivation; and levels of motivation would be significantly different across two divisions. Regression analyses were employed to determine relationships and MANOVA tested for differences between divisions. The paper utilised Bass’s multifactor theory of leadership, various theories of psychological contract breach and fulfilment, Schaufeli and Bakker’s conceptualisation of engagement, Meyer’s three-component model of commitment and various theories of motivation. Analysis found that transformational and transactional leadership were significantly related to levels of engagement and the autonomous dimension of motivation; transformational leadership was significantly related to levels of normative commitment; and the divisions differed in levels of controlled motivation. The remaining hypotheses were unsupported. Theoretical and practical implications and limitations of this study are outlined and recommendations suggested.
Links: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/10902
Type: Dissertation
Level: Masters
Qualification: MSc
Rights: Copyright © the author, 2011
Description: The full text of this dissertation is available only to University of Leicester members. Please log in with your CFS username and password when prompted.
Appears in Collections:Masters' Dissertations, School of Psychology

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