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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/10904

Title: How Effective is Workplace Counselling in Improving Employee Well-Being and Performance?
Authors: Chan, Yim Khim
Award date: 2011
Abstract: This study reviews published empirical research on the effectiveness of workplace counselling in improving employee well-being (including workplace stress, burnout and depression) and performance. Search and review was conducted on empirical studies published between 1980 and 2011 in English-language, peer-reviewed journals. Forty-six studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria, out of which twenty-nine studies are of high methodological quality. These studies indicate that workplace counselling improves employee well-being; the intervention helps employees in alleviating symptoms of workplace stress, burnout and depression. However, workplace counselling seems to have neutral effect on employee performance, although some studies reported reduction in absenteeism and positive impact on work performance. Regardless of the outcome to the organisation, employees almost unanimously reported satisfaction with the workplace counselling sessions and found them to be helpful, personally and professionally. Future research could provide more clarity on the relationship between impact of workplace counselling on employee performance, by conducting more rigorous, long-term studies on the intervention and its partnership with organisational interventions, in which this is lacking currently. With the possibility of employee’s improved well-being impacting performance positively, this review aids organisation’s consideration in using workplace counselling; as a tool to restore employees and potentially to improve organisational performance.
Links: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/10904
Type: Dissertation
Level: Masters
Qualification: MSc
Rights: Copyright © the author, 2011
Description: The full text of this dissertation is available only to University of Leicester members. Please log in with your CFS username and password when prompted.
Appears in Collections:Masters' Dissertations, School of Psychology

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