Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/12738
Title: Association of Sedentary Behaviour with Metabolic Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis
Authors: Edwardson, C. L.
Gorely, T.
Davies, M. J.
Gray, L. J.
Khunti, K.
Wilmot, E. G.
Yates, T.
Biddle, S. J.
First Published: 13-Apr-2012
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: PLOS ONE, 2012, 7 (4), pp. e34916-e34916
Abstract: Background: In recent years there has been a growing interest in the relationship between sedentary behaviour (sitting) and health outcomes. Only recently have there been studies assessing the association between time spent in sedentary behaviour and the metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to quantify the association between sedentary behaviour and the metabolic syndrome in adults using meta-analysis. Methodology/Principal Findings: Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched using medical subject headings and key words related to sedentary behaviours and the metabolic syndrome. Reference lists of relevant articles and personal databases were hand searched. Inclusion criteria were: (1) cross sectional or prospective design; (2) include adults ≥18 years of age; (3) self-reported or objectively measured sedentary time; and (4) an outcome measure of metabolic syndrome. Odds Ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals for metabolic syndrome comparing the highest level of sedentary behaviour to the lowest were extracted for each study. Data were pooled using random effects models to take into account heterogeneity between studies. Ten cross-sectional studies (n = 21393 participants), one high, four moderate and five poor quality, were identified. Greater time spent sedentary increased the odds of metabolic syndrome by 73% (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.55–1.94, p<0.0001). There were no differences for subgroups of sex, sedentary behaviour measure, metabolic syndrome definition, study quality or country income. There was no evidence of statistical heterogeneity (I2 = 0.0%, p = 0.61) or publication bias (Eggers test t = 1.05, p = 0.32). Conclusions: People who spend higher amounts of time in sedentary behaviours have greater odds of having metabolic syndrome. Reducing sedentary behaviours is potentially important for the prevention of metabolic syndrome.
DOI Link: 10.1371/journal.pone.0034916
eISSN: 1932-6203
Links: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/12738
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0034916
Version: Publisher Version
Status: Peer-reviewed
Type: Journal Article
Rights: Copyright © 2012 Edwardson et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, Dept. of Health Sciences

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
journal.pone.0034916.pdfPublished (publisher PDF)250.63 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in LRA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.