Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/15010
Title: Use of recombinant calreticulin and cercarial transformation fluid (CTF) in the serodiagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni.
Authors: El Aswad BELD
Doenhoff, MJ
El Hadidi AS
Schwaeble, WJ
Lynch, NJ
First Published: Mar-2011
Citation: IMMUNOBIOLOGY, 2011, 216 (3), pp. 379-385
Abstract: Schistosomiasis is traditionally diagnosed by microscopic detection of ova in stool samples, but this method is labour intensive and its sensitivity is limited by low and variable egg secretion in many patients. An alternative is an ELISA using Schistosoma mansoni soluble egg antigen (SEA) to detect anti-schistosome antibody in patient samples. SEA is a good diagnostic marker in non-endemic regions but is of limited value in endemic regions, mainly because of its high cost and limited specificity. Here we assess seven novel antigens for the detection of S. mansoni antibody in an endemic region (the Northern Nile Delta). Using recombinant S. mansoni calreticulin (CRT) and fragments thereof, anti-CRT antibodies were detected in the majority of 97 patients sera. The diagnostic value of some of these antigens was, however, limited by the presence of cross-reacting antibody in the healthy controls, even those recruited in non-endemic areas. Cercarial transformation fluid (CTF), a supernatant that contains soluble material released by the cercariae upon transformation to the schistosomula, is cheaper and easier to produce than SEA. An ELISA using CTF as the detection antigen had a sensitivity of 89.7% and an estimated specificity of 100% when used in non-endemic regions, matching the performance of the established SEA ELISA. CTF was substantially more specific than SEA for diagnosis in the endemic region, and less susceptible than SEA to cross-reacting antibody in the sera of controls with other protozoan and metazoan infections.
DOI Link: 10.1016/j.imbio.2010.06.014
eISSN: 1878-3279
Links: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/15010
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, Dept. of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation

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