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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/1655

Title: Plasma levels of the endocannabinoid anandamide in women - a potential role in pregnancy maintenance and labor?
Authors: Habayeb, Osama M. H.
Taylor, Anthony H.
Evans, Mark D.
Cooke, Marcus S.
Taylor, David J.
Bell, Stephen C.
Konje, Justin C.
Issue Date: 1-Nov-2004
Publisher: The Endocrine Society
Citation: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 2004, 89 (11), pp. 5482-5487
Abstract: Although exposure to exocannabinoids (e.g. marijuana) is associated with adverse pregnancy outcome, little is known about the biochemistry, physiology, and consequences of endocannabinoids in human pregnancy. In these studies, we measured the levels of the endocannabinoid anandamide (N-arachidonoylethanolamine, AEA) by HPLC-mass spectrometry in 77 pregnant and 25 nonpregnant women. The mean ± sem plasma AEA levels in the first, second, and third trimesters were 0.89 ± 0.14, 0.44 ± 0.12, and 0.42 ± 0.11 nm, respectively. The levels in the first trimester were significantly higher than those in either the second or third trimester. During labor, AEA levels were 3.7 times nonlaboring term levels (2.5 ± 0.22 vs. 0.68 ± 0.09 nm, P < 0.0001). During the menstrual cycle, levels in the follicular phase were significantly higher than those in the luteal phase (1.68 ± 0.16 vs. 0.87 ± 0.09 nm, P < 0.005). Postmenopausal and luteal-phase levels were similar to those in the first trimester. These findings suggest that successful pregnancy implantation and progression requires low levels of AEA. At term, AEA levels dramatically increase during labor and are affected by the duration of labor, suggesting a role for AEA in normal labor.
DOI Link: 10.1210/jc.2004-0681
ISSN: 0021-972X
eISSN: 1945-7197
Links: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/1655
http://jcem.endojournals.org/content/89/(...)
Version: Publisher Version
Status: Peer-reviewed
Type: Article
Rights: Copyright © 2004 by The Endocrine Society. Deposited with reference to the publisher’s archiving policy available on the SHERPA/RoMEO website.
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, Dept. of Cancer Studies and Molecular Medicine

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