Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/23767
Title: Reprinted article "Subintimal angioplasty of femoropopliteal artery occlusions: the long-term results".
Authors: London, NJ
Srinivasan, R
Naylor, AR
Hartshorne, T
Ratliff, DA
Bell, PR
Bolia, A
First Published: Sep-2011
Citation: EUR J VASC ENDOVASC SURG, 2011, 42 Suppl 1, pp. S9-15
Abstract: The technique of subintimal angioplasty has been attempted on 200 consecutive femoropopliteal artery occlusions of median (range) length 11 (2-37) cm. The principle of the technique is to traverse the occlusion in the subintimal plane and recanalise by inflating the angioplasty balloon within the subintimal space. The technical success rate was 159/200 (80%) and was not significantly different for occlusions <10 cm (81%, n = 73), 11-20 cm (83%, n = 63) or >20 cm (68%, n = 23), p = 0.20. There were no deaths nor limb loss resulting from the procedure. The median (range) ankle-brachial pressure index increased from 0.61 (0.21-1.0) preangioplasty to 0.90 (0.26-1.50) postangioplasty. The actuarial haemodynamic patencies of technically successful procedures at 12 and 36 months were 71% and 58% respectively, the symptomatic patencies were 73% and 61%. A multiple regression analysis showed that smoking multiplied the risk of reocclusion by 2.70 (p < 0.001), each additional run-off vessel reduced the risk by 0.54 (p < 0.001) and the risk increased by 1.73 (p = 0.020) for every 10 cm of occlusion length. In conclusion, the technical success rate (80%) of subintimal angioplasty for femoropopliteal occlusions is unrelated to occlusion length and for all procedures, including technical failures, cumulative symptomatic and haemodynamic patencies of 46 and 48% can be achieved at 3 years. The factors influencing long-term patency were smoking, the number of calf run-off vessels and occlusion length.
DOI Link: 10.1016/j.ejvs.2011.06.018
eISSN: 1532-2165
Links: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/23767
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, Dept. of Cardiovascular Sciences

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