Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/27705
Title: The Influence of Transactional/Transformational Leadership and Trust on Service Oriented Citizenship Behaviours
Authors: Shingler, Deborah
Award date: 2012
Abstract: Purpose: This study seeks to examine how transactional/transformational leadership and trust influence service oriented citizenship behaviours. It was undertaken within the professional services organisation of a leading, independent IT management software company that employs 14,000 employees globally. Respondents were employed in the European geographical region. Design/Approach: Extending the SOCB literature, this study involved high customer contact employees (IT Service Consultants, Architect and Project/Programme Managers) employed in 14 European countries. Respondents provided self-report data of perceived leadership, trust and SOCBs. Measures were administered online using Survey Monkey. A total of 101 participants provided data for analysis. Correlation analysis, regression analysis and mediation analyses were conducted to test research hypotheses. Findings: The results indicated that the effects of the transactional/transformational leadership paradigm on SOCBs are primarily direct. Trust was positively related to SOCBs and may explain some of the influence of leadership behaviours on SOCBs. The implication of these findings for future research on leader behaviours, trust and SOCBs are discussed. Practical Implications: This study demonstrates the importance of SOCBs for an IT professional services organisation and how leadership and trust may influence their application. Professional services organisations may benefit from the knowledge that these links are likely to generate favourable outcomes for customers, employees and the organisation as a whole. Originality/Value: This study represents the first attempt to empirically examine the influence of leadership and trust on SOCBs in a professional service organisation in Europe.
Links: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/27705
Type: Dissertation
Level: Masters
Qualification: MSc
Rights: Copyright © the author, 2012
Description: The full text of this dissertation is available only to University of Leicester members. Please log in with your University IT account username and password when prompted.
Appears in Collections:Masters' Dissertations, School of Psychology

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