Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/29119
Title: Rethinking the global trends of education governance reforms : experiences over the past few decades in England
Other Titles: 教育ガバナンス改革の世界的潮流を再考する:過去数十年の英国の経験
Authors: Taysum, Alison
First Published: 12-Oct-2013
Presented at: The 48th Annual Conference of the Japan Educational Administration Society, half day International Symposium Supported by the Japan Educational Administration Society and the Korean Society for the Studies of Educational Administration, 12th Oct 2013, Kyoto, Japan
Citation: Taysum, A (2013) Rethinking the global trends of education governance reforms : experiences over the past few decades in England Presented at the 48th Annual Conference of the Japan Educational Administration Society 'Rethinking the Global Trends of Education Governance Reforms : Experiences over the Past Few Decades in Four Countries', pp.37 - 56
Abstract: In England, there is a problem with regard to gaining consensus on the purposes of education and then developing education reforms to meet those purposes. The focus of this paper is to make a modest contribution to shedding light on this problem. To do this the paper has four aims. First, to explore a theory of state, participation and knowledge that will facilitate the rethinking of a shift in England from Government reforms in education, to structures and providers of education governance reforms. Second, to draw on Taysum (2012) to map education reforms in England from the Second World War to 2013. Third, to read the education reforms through the theory of state participation and knowledge. Finally to make a contribution to this symposium to gain new insights into common trends found in the characteristics and problems of education reforms in the U.K., the U.S., and South Korea, and Japan. Over the past few decades in England, the scope of education reforms has been characterized by government reforms, and shifts to governance reforms from ‘education for all’ to the commodification of education and a ‘strategy of separatism’. Education contents have moved from being redesigned, to public education being reframed in its structure and providers. Education reforms have been promoted in response to common social conditions. Ball (2004) suggests these might include the relationship between the state and the professions offering services, timing, naive research that on the whole ignores the messiness of school life, financial issues, and research that provides control mechanisms for policy makers. However these items do not consider a theory of the state that seeks to operationalize resources, and shift accountability away from Government, to governance of independent enterprises within the market. Such a theory of the state replicates social relations that sustain hegemonies in favour of those that hold power to ensure retention of power (Ball, 2004). Thus it is important to rethink Government, and governance systems with regard to education reforms and their relationship with three aspects. First economic conditions of economic growth or economic deficit. Second, power relations that do or do not facilitate stakeholder participation. Finally, the kind of knowledge that is produced, and/or exchanged, and/or 38 or transmitted. The paper takes Gale’s (2001) socio-historiographical approach to policy analyses to identify potential relationships between the socio-ed ucational present and the socio-educational past. This is achieved through the systematic and rigorous engagement with materials from the past and present. The approach enables historical stages to be revealed. A critical engagement with these stages may produce new knowledge about the public issues and private troubles (Taysum and Iqbal, 2012). To address the aims I ask four questions. First, what theories of the state and participation enable the rethinking of features, actors and backgrounds of educational reforms? Second, how can education reforms in England from the Second Worl d War to date be mapped? Third, how can these education reforms be understood in terms of a theory of the state and participation? Fourth, to what extent can this theorizing be applied to this symposium to gain new insights into common trends found in the characteristics and problems of education reforms in the U.K., the U.S., South Korea, and Japan?
Links: http://www.educ.kyoto-u.ac.jp/compoli/taikai/07symposium.pdf
http://hdl.handle.net/2381/29119
Type: Conference Paper
Description: The full text of this presentation is available via the links above.
Appears in Collections:Conference Papers & Presentations, School of Education

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