Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/31948
Title: Serum potassium and glucose regulation in the ADDITION- Leicester screening study
Authors: Carter, Patrice
Bodicoat, Danielle H.
Quinn, L. M.
Zaccardi, Francesco
Webb, David
Khunti, Kamlesh
Davies, Melanie J.
First Published: Mar-2015
Publisher: Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Citation: Journal of Diabetes Research Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 923749, 4 pages
Abstract: Introduction: Previous observational studies have shown conflicting results between plasma K+ concentrations and risk of type 2 diabetes. To help clarify the evidence we aimed to determine whether an association existed between serum K+ and glucose regulation within a UK multi ethnic population Methods: Participants were recruited as part of the ADDITION Leicester study, a population based screening study. Individuals from primary care between the age of 40-75 years if White European or 25-75 years if South Asian or Afro Caribbean were recruited. Tests for associations between baseline characteristics and K+ quartiles were conducted using linear regression models. Results: Data showed individuals in the lowest K+ quartile had significantly greater 2-hour glucose levels (0.53mmol/l, 95% CI: 0.36-0.70, p≤0.001) than those in the highest K+ quartile. This estimation did not change with adjustment for potential confounders. Conversely, participants in the lowest K+ quartile had a 0.14% lower HbA1c (95% CI - 0.19- 0.10: P≤0.001) compared to those in the highest K+ quartile. Conclusion: This cross sectional analysis demonstrated that lower K+ was associated with greater 2hr-glucose. The data supports the possibility that K+ may influence glucose regulation and further research is warranted.
DOI Link: 10.1155/2015/923749
ISSN: 2314-6745
eISSN: 2314-6753
Links: http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jdr/2015/923749/
http://hdl.handle.net/2381/31948
Version: Publisher Version
Status: Peer-reviewed
Type: Journal Article
Rights: Copyright © 2015 Patrice Carter et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, College of Medicine, Biological Sciences and Psychology

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