Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/32308
Title: Prevalence and incidence of hypoglycaemia in 532,542 people with Type 2 diabetes on oral therapies and insulin: a systematic review and meta-analysis of population based studies
Authors: Edridge, Chloe L.
Dunkley, Alison J.
Bodicoat, Danielle H.
Rose, Tanith C.
Gray, Laura J.
Davies, Melanie J.
Khunti, Kamlesh
First Published: 11-Mar-2015
Publisher: Wiley for Diabetes UK
Citation: Diabetic Medicine, 2015, 32 (Suppl.) , pp. 22-23 (2)
Abstract: Objective: To collate and evaluate the current literature reporting the prevalence and incidence of hypoglycaemia in population based studies of type 2 diabetes. Research design and methods: Medline, Embase and Cochrane were searched up to February 2014 to identify population based studies reporting the proportion of people with type 2 diabetes experiencing hypoglycaemia or rate of events experienced. Two reviewers independently screened studies for eligibility and extracted data for included studies. Random effects meta-analyses were carried out to calculate the prevalence and incidence of hypoglycaemia. Results: 46 studies (n=532,542) met the inclusion criteria. Prevalence of hypoglycaemia was 45% (95%CI 0.34,0.57) for mild/moderate and 6% (95%CI, 0.05,0.07) for severe. Incidence of hypoglycaemic episodes per person-year for mild/moderate and for severe was 19 (95%CI 0.00, 51.08) and 0.80 (95%CI 0.00,2.15), respectively. Hypoglycaemia was prevalent amongst those on insulin; for mild/moderate episodes the prevalence was 50% and incidence 23 events per person-year, and for severe episodes the prevalence was 21% and incidence 1 event per person-year. For treatment regimes that included a sulphonylurea, mild/moderate prevalence was 30% and incidence 2 events per person-year, and severe prevalence was 5% and incidence 0.01 events per person-year. A similar prevalence of 5% was found for treatment regimes that did not include sulphonylureas. Conclusions: Current evidence shows hypoglycaemia is considerably prevalent amongst people with type 2 diabetes, particularly for those on insulin, yet still fairly common for other treatment regimens. This highlights the subsequent need for educational interventions and individualisation of therapies to reduce the risk of hypoglycaemia.
DOI Link: 10.1111/dme.12665_12
ISSN: 0742-3071
eISSN: 1464-5491
Links: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/32308
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/dme.12665_12/abstract
Version: Post-print
Status: Peer-reviewed
Type: Journal Article
Rights: Archived with reference to SHERPA/RoMEO and publisher website. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Diabetic Medicine, 2015, 32 (Suppl.) , pp. 22-23 (2), which has been published in final form at dx.doi.org/10.1111/dme.12665_12. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving. 1 year embargo.
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, Dept. of Cardiovascular Sciences

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