Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/36720
Title: Chronic Aspergillus fumigatus colonisation of the paediatric cystic fibrosis airway is common and may be associated with a more rapid decline in lung function
Authors: Gaillard, Erol
Saunders, Rosalind V.
Modha, Deborah E.
Claydon, Alison
First Published: 17-Jan-2016
Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)
Citation: Medical Mycology, 2016 (Advance Access)
Abstract: Filamentous fungi are commonly isolated from the respiratory tract of CF patients, but their clinical significance is uncertain and the reported incidence variable. We report on the degree of Aspergillus fumigatus airway colonization in a tertiary pediatric CF cohort, evaluate the sensitivity of routine clinical sampling at detecting A. fumigatus, and compare lung function of A. fumigatus-colonized and non-colonized children. We carried out an 8-year retrospective cohort analysis using local databases, examining 1024 respiratory microbiological specimens from 45 children. Nineteen (42%) had a positive A. fumigatus culture at least once during the 8-year period, with 10 (22%) children persistently colonized. Overall, 29% of 48 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples tested positive for A. fumigatus, compared with 14% of 976 sputum samples. Of 33 children for whom lung function data were available during the study period, seven were classed as having severe lung disease, of whom four (57%) were persistently colonized with A. fumigatus. We conclude that chronic A. fumigatus colonization of the CF airway is common, and may be associated with worse lung function. In our practice, BAL appears superior at detecting lower airway A. fumigatus compared to sputum samples.
DOI Link: 10.1093/mmy/myv119
ISSN: 1369-3786
eISSN: 1460-2709
Links: http://mmy.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2016/01/17/mmy.myv119.abstract
http://hdl.handle.net/2381/36720
Embargo on file until: 17-Jan-2017
Version: Post-print
Status: Peer-reviewed
Type: Journal Article
Rights: Copyright © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Medical Mycology following peer review. The version of record Med Mycol (2016) is available online at: dx.doi.org/10.1093/mmy/myv119
Description: The file associated with this record is under a 12-month embargo from publication in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. The full text may be available through the publisher links provided above.
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, Dept. of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation

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