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Title: The Degree to Which Students and Teachers Are Involved in Second-Level School Processes and Participation in Decision Making: An Irish Case Study
Authors: Taysum, Alison S.
Harrison, Kathy
McNamara, Gerry
O'Hara, Joe
First Published: 2-Mar-2016
Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Citation: Irish Educational Studies, 2016, in press
Abstract: The Education Act (1998) is a key policy document in Irish education, emphasising the rights, roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders, including parents, teachers and pupils in schools. Since 1998 the Department of Education and Skills (DES) has stressed the need to introduce an increased role for teachers and pupils in decision-making. It is therefore timely to explore the response of teachers and students to such a collaborative school environment in a rural second-level school of approximately 600 students. Transition year (TY) students (ages about 15–16) and their teachers were surveyed by questionnaire and interviewed. It finds that while the school is proactive in involving students and teachers in decision-making, a source of social, personal and professional empowerment, experienced teachers, and students in particular, want a more substantial voice. For example, most students want more say. They want class discussions or a vote, not just Student Council (SC) representation, on important and not just trivial issues. They want involvement before decisions are taken, with more feedback. Overall, participation is considered important by all stakeholders.
DOI Link: 10.1080/03323315.2016.1146156
ISSN: 0332-3315
eISSN: 1747-4965
Embargo on file until: 2-Sep-2017
Version: Post-print
Status: Peer-reviewed
Type: Journal Article
Rights: Copyright © 2016, Taylor and Francis. All rights reserved. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis.
Description: The file associated with this record is under an 18-month embargo from publication in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. The full text may be available through the publisher links provided above.
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, School of Education

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