Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/36852
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dc.contributor.authorBanahan, C.-
dc.contributor.authorRogerson, Z.-
dc.contributor.authorRousseau, C.-
dc.contributor.authorRamnarine, K. V.-
dc.contributor.authorEvans, D. H.-
dc.contributor.authorChung, Emma Ming Lin-
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-24T10:21:46Z-
dc.date.available2016-02-24T10:21:46Z-
dc.date.issued2014-09-11-
dc.identifier.citationUltrasound in Medicine and Biology, 2014, 40 (11), pp. 2642-2654en
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301562914003913en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2381/36852-
dc.description.abstractThe ability to distinguish harmful solid cerebral emboli from gas bubbles intra-operatively has potential to direct interventions to reduce the risk of brain injury. In this in vitro study, two embolus discrimination techniques, dual-frequency (DF) and frequency modulation (FM) methods, are simultaneously compared to assess discrimination of potentially harmful large pieces of carotid plaque debris (0.5-1.55 mm) and thrombus-mimicking material (0.5-2 mm) from gas bubbles (0.01-2.5 mm). Detection of plaque and thrombus-mimic using the DF technique yielded disappointing results, with four out of five particles being misclassified (sensitivity: 18%; specificity: 89%). Although the FM method offered improved sensitivity, a higher number of false positives were observed (sensitivity: 72%; specificity: 50%). Optimum differentiation was achieved using the difference between peak embolus/blood ratio and mean embolus/blood ratio (sensitivity: 77%; specificity: 81%). We conclude that existing DF and FM techniques are unable to confidently distinguish large solid emboli from small gas bubbles (<50 μm).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier for World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biologyen
dc.relation.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25218455-
dc.rightsCopyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en
dc.subjectDiscriminationen
dc.subjectEmbolien
dc.subjectEmbolus detectionen
dc.subjectTranscranial Doppler ultrasounden
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectIn Vitro Techniquesen
dc.subjectIntracranial Embolismen
dc.subjectPhantoms, Imagingen
dc.subjectReproducibility of Resultsen
dc.subjectSensitivity and Specificityen
dc.subjectThrombosisen
dc.subjectUltrasonography, Doppler, Transcranialen
dc.titleAn in vitro comparison of embolus differentiation techniques for clinically significant macroemboli : dual-frequency technique versus frequency modulation methoden
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2014.06.003-
dc.identifier.eissn1879-291X-
dc.identifier.piiS0301-5629(14)00391-3-
dc.description.statusPeer-revieweden
dc.description.versionPublisher Versionen
dc.type.subtypeComparative Study;Journal Article;Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't-
pubs.organisational-group/Organisationen
pubs.organisational-group/Organisation/COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND PSYCHOLOGYen
pubs.organisational-group/Organisation/COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND PSYCHOLOGY/School of Medicineen
pubs.organisational-group/Organisation/COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND PSYCHOLOGY/School of Medicine/Department of Cardiovascular Sciencesen
pubs.organisational-group/Organisation/COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND PSYCHOLOGY/Themesen
pubs.organisational-group/Organisation/COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND PSYCHOLOGY/Themes/Cardiovascularen
dc.dateaccepted2014-06-03-
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, Dept. of Cardiovascular Sciences

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