Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/37484
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dc.contributor.authorGleadall, Andrew-
dc.contributor.authorPan, Jingzhe-
dc.contributor.authorKruft, Marc-Anton-
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-05T11:28:59Z-
dc.date.available2017-07-31T01:45:08Z-
dc.date.issued2015-07-31-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials, 2015, 51, pp. 237–247en
dc.identifier.issn1751-6161-
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1751616115002519en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2381/37484-
dc.descriptionThe file associated with this record is under a 24-month embargo from publication in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. The full text may be available through the publisher links provided above.en
dc.description.abstractAtomic simulations were undertaken to analyse the effect of polymer chain scission on amorphous poly(lactide) during degradation. Many experimental studies have analysed mechanical properties degradation but relatively few computation studies have been conducted. Such studies are valuable for supporting the design of bioresorbable medical devices. Hence in this paper, an Effective Cavity Theory for the degradation of Young's modulus was developed. Atomic simulations indicated that a volume of reduced-stiffness polymer may exist around chain scissions. In the Effective Cavity Theory, each chain scission is considered to instantiate an effective cavity. Finite Element Analysis simulations were conducted to model the effect of the cavities on Young's modulus. Since polymer crystallinity affects mechanical properties, the effect of increases in crystallinity during degradation on Young's modulus is also considered. To demonstrate the ability of the Effective Cavity Theory, it was fitted to several sets of experimental data for Young's modulus in the literature.en
dc.description.sponsorshipAndrew Gleadall acknowledges an EPSRC PhD studentship and a partial PhD studentship from the University of Leicester.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26275486-
dc.rightsCopyright © the authors, 2015. After an embargo period this will be an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ ), which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.en
dc.subjectBiodegradable polymersen
dc.subjectComputer modellingen
dc.subjectDegradationen
dc.subjectMechanical propertiesen
dc.subjectYoung’s modulusen
dc.titleAn atomic finite element model for biodegradable polymers. Part 2. A model for change in Young's modulus due to polymer chain scissionen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jmbbm.2015.07.010-
dc.identifier.eissn1878-0180-
dc.identifier.piiS1751-6161(15)00251-9-
dc.description.statusPeer-revieweden
dc.description.versionPost-printen
dc.type.subtypeJournal Article;Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't-
pubs.organisational-group/Organisationen
pubs.organisational-group/Organisation/COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERINGen
pubs.organisational-group/Organisation/COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING/Department of Engineeringen
dc.dateaccepted2015-07-15-
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, Dept. of Engineering

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