Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/37826
Title: Mitofusin-mediated ER stress triggers neurodegeneration in pink1/parkin models of Parkinson's disease.
Authors: Celardo, I.
Costa, A. C.
Lehmann, S.
Jones, C.
Wood, N.
Mencacci, N. E.
Mallucci, G. R.
Loh, S. H.
Martins, L. Miguel
First Published: 23-Jun-2016
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Citation: Cell Death and Disease, 2016, 7 (6), e2271
Abstract: Mutations in PINK1 and PARKIN cause early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD), thought to be due to mitochondrial toxicity. Here, we show that in Drosophila pink1 and parkin mutants, defective mitochondria also give rise to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signalling, specifically to the activation of the protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) branch of the unfolded protein response (UPR). We show that enhanced ER stress signalling in pink1 and parkin mutants is mediated by mitofusin bridges, which occur between defective mitochondria and the ER. Reducing mitofusin contacts with the ER is neuroprotective, through suppression of PERK signalling, while mitochondrial dysfunction remains unchanged. Further, both genetic inhibition of dPerk-dependent ER stress signalling and pharmacological inhibition using the PERK inhibitor GSK2606414 were neuroprotective in both pink1 and parkin mutants. We conclude that activation of ER stress by defective mitochondria is neurotoxic in pink1 and parkin flies and that the reduction of this signalling is neuroprotective, independently of defective mitochondria. A video abstract for this article is available online in the supplementary information.
DOI Link: 10.1038/cddis.2016.173
eISSN: 2041-4889
Links: http://www.nature.com/cddis/journal/v7/n6/full/cddis2016173a.html
http://hdl.handle.net/2381/37826
Version: Publisher Version
Status: Peer-reviewed
Type: Journal Article
Rights: Copyright © the authors, 2016. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, Dept. of Molecular and Cell Biology

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