Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/38474
Title: Fractionated radiation exposure amplifies the radioresistant nature of prostate cancer cells.
Authors: McDermott, N.
Meunier, A.
Mooney, B.
Nortey, G.
Hernandez, C.
Hurley, S.
Lynam-Lennon, N.
Barsoom, S. H.
Bowman, K. J.
Marples, B.
Jones, G. D.
Marignol, L.
First Published: 5-Oct-2016
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Citation: Scientific Reports, 2016, 6:34796
Abstract: The risk of recurrence following radiation therapy remains high for a significant number of prostate cancer patients. The development of in vitro isogenic models of radioresistance through exposure to fractionated radiation is an increasingly used approach to investigate the mechanisms of radioresistance in cancer cells and help guide improvements in radiotherapy standards. We treated 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells with fractionated 2 Gy radiation to a cumulative total dose of 60 Gy. This process selected for 22Rv1-cells with increased clonogenic survival following subsequent radiation exposure but increased sensitivity to Docetaxel. This RR-22Rv1 cell line was enriched in S-phase cells, less susceptible to DNA damage, radiation-induced apoptosis and acquired enhanced migration potential, when compared to wild type and aged matched control 22Rv1 cells. The selection of radioresistant cancer cells during fractionated radiation therapy may have implications in the development and administration of future targeted therapy in conjunction with radiation therapy.
DOI Link: 10.1038/srep34796
ISSN: 2045-2322
eISSN: 2045-2322
Links: http://www.nature.com/articles/srep34796
http://hdl.handle.net/2381/38474
Version: Publisher Version
Status: Peer-reviewed
Type: Journal Article
Rights: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, College of Medicine, Biological Sciences and Psychology

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