Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/38668
Title: Power flow analysis and optimal locations of resistive type superconducting fault current limiters
Authors: Zhang, X.
Ruiz, Harold S.
Gang, J.
Shen, B.
Fu, L.
Zhang, H.
Coombs, T. A.
First Published: 14-Nov-2016
Publisher: SpringerOpen
Citation: SpringerPlus, 2016, 5 (1972), pp. 1-20 (20)
Abstract: Based on conventional approaches for the integration of resistive-type superconducting fault current limiters (SFCLs) on electric distribution networks, SFCL models largely rely on the insertion of a step or exponential resistance that is determined by a predefined quenching time. In this paper, we expand the scope of the aforementioned models by considering the actual behaviour of an SFCL in terms of the temperature dynamic power-law dependence between the electrical field and the current density, characteristic of high temperature superconductors. Our results are compared to the step-resistance models for the sake of discussion and clarity of the conclusions. Both SFCL models were integrated into a power system model built based on the UK power standard, to study the impact of these protection strategies on the performance of the overall electricity network. As a representative renewable energy source, a 90 MVA wind farm was considered for the simulations. Three fault conditions were simulated, and the figures for the fault current reduction predicted by both fault current limiting models have been compared in terms of multiple current measuring points and allocation strategies. Consequently, we have shown that the incorporation of the E–J characteristics and thermal properties of the superconductor at the simulation level of electric power systems, is crucial for estimations of reliability and determining the optimal locations of resistive type SFCLs in distributed power networks. Our results may help decision making by distribution network operators regarding investment and promotion of SFCL technologies, as it is possible to determine the maximum number of SFCLs necessary to protect against different fault conditions at multiple locations.
DOI Link: 10.1186/s40064-016-3649-4
ISSN: 2193-1801
eISSN: 2193-1801
Links: http://springerplus.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s40064-016-3649-4
http://hdl.handle.net/2381/38668
Version: Publisher Version
Status: Peer-reviewed
Type: Journal Article
Rights: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, Dept. of Engineering

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