Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/38743
Title: Epicardial adipose tissue in patients with end-stage renal disease on haemodialysis.
Authors: Graham-Brown, Mathew P. M.
McCann, Gerry P.
Burton, James O.
First Published: Nov-2015
Publisher: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
Citation: Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension, 2015, 24 (6), pp. 517-524
Abstract: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is the visceral fat of the heart, sharing many of the pathophysiological properties of other visceral fat depots. EAT is a metabolically active paracrine and vasocrine organ that causes local cardiac inflammation and is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of coronary atherosclerosis. This article highlights the findings of recent observational studies in patients on haemodialysis that link the quantity of EAT to increased rates of cardiovascular and coronary artery disease and review the proposed methods of pathogenesis and the possible role of EAT quantification to improve cardiovascular risk assessment. RECENT FINDINGS: Increasing volumes of EAT in patients on haemodialysis correlate with increased inflammatory mediators, higher rates of cardiovascular disease and coronary artery calcification, independent of general adiposity. EAT is an independent predictor of mortality and a potentially modifiable target for therapeutic interventions. SUMMARY: EAT is likely to play a central role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in patients on haemodialysis, adds incrementally to conventional cardiovascular risk stratification models and is a potential target for therapeutic intervention.
DOI Link: 10.1097/MNH.0000000000000161
ISSN: 1062-4821
eISSN: 1473-6543
Links: http://journals.lww.com/co-nephrolhypertens/pages/articleviewer.aspx?year=2015&issue=11000&article=00009&type=abstract
http://hdl.handle.net/2381/38743
Version: Post-print
Status: Peer-reviewed
Type: Journal Article
Rights: Creative Commons “Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives” licence CC BY-NC-ND, further details of which can be found via the following link: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ Archived with reference to SHERPA/RoMEO and publisher website.
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, Dept. of Cardiovascular Sciences

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