Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/39123
Title: A decision analytic model to investigate the cost-effectiveness of poisoning prevention practices in households with young children.
Authors: Achana, F.
Sutton, Alex J.
Kendrick, D
Hayes, M
Jones, David R.
Hubbard, Stephanie J.
Cooper, Nicola J.
First Published: 3-Aug-2016
Citation: BMC Public Health, 2016 16:705
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Systematic reviews and a network meta-analysis show home safety education with or without the provision of safety equipment is effective in promoting poison prevention behaviours in households with children. This paper compares the cost-effectiveness of home safety interventions to promote poison prevention practices. METHODS: A probabilistic decision-analytic model simulates healthcare costs and benefits for a hypothetical cohort of under 5 year olds. The model compares the cost-effectiveness of home safety education, home safety inspections, provision of free or low cost safety equipment and fitting of equipment. Analyses are conducted from a UK National Health Service and Personal Social Services perspective and expressed in 2012 prices. RESULTS: Education without safety inspection, provision or fitting of equipment was the most cost-effective strategy for promoting safe storage of medicines with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £2888 (95 % credible interval (CrI) £1990-£5774) per poison case avoided or £41,330 (95%CrI £20,007-£91,534) per QALY gained compared with usual care. Compared to usual care, home safety interventions were not cost-effective in promoting safe storage of other household products. CONCLUSION: Education offers better value for money than more intensive but expensive strategies for preventing medicinal poisonings, but is only likely to be cost-effective at £30,000 per QALY gained for families in disadvantaged areas and for those with more than one child. There was considerable uncertainty in cost-effectiveness estimates due to paucity of evidence on model parameters. Policy makers should consider both costs and effectiveness of competing interventions to ensure efficient use of resources.
DOI Link: 10.1186/s12889-016-3334-0
eISSN: 1471-2458
Links: http://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-016-3334-0
http://hdl.handle.net/2381/39123
Version: Publisher Version
Status: Peer-reviewed
Type: Journal Article
Rights: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Description: Additional files available via journal of record website
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, Dept. of Health Sciences



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