Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/39490
Title: The relationship between the Leicester cough questionnaire, eosinophilic airway inflammation and asthma patient related outcomes in severe adult asthma
Authors: Natarajan, Sushiladevi
Free, Robert C.
Bradding, Peter
McGarvey, Lorcan
Siddiqui, Salman
First Published: 4-Mar-2017
Publisher: BioMed Central
Citation: Respiratory Research, 2017, 18:44
Abstract: Severe asthma is characterised by a variety of symptoms, which include chronic cough, however the mechanisms responsible for cough reflex hypersensitivity in asthma remain poorly elucidated. Current asthma patient-related outcome instruments such as the six-point Juniper Asthma Control Score (ACQ-6) and Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ) were not primarily designed to capture cough and its related morbidity in asthma. The Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ) is a patient-related outcome instrument designed to capture the health-related quality of life associated with cough. To date the LCQ has not been evaluated in a severe asthma population. Methods: We evaluated 262 extensively characterised adult patients with severe asthma attending the Leicester Severe Asthma Service. All patients had a clinician diagnosis of asthma and objective physiological evidence and met the ATS/ERS criterion for servere asthma. In all patients we evaluated a) the LCQ distribution and b) the relationships between the LCQ and ACQ-6, AQLQ, airway inflammation in sputum. Results: The LCQ demonstrated the following properties; mean: 15.0, standard deviation: 4.54, median: 15.48, and range: 11.6-19.2. We found a moderate correlation between LCQ and ACQ-6 (r = - 0.605, p < 0.0001) and a LCQ and AQLQ (r = 0.710, p < 0.0001). There was no relationship between LCQ and log10 sputum percentage eosinophils (%). Conclusion: A proportion of patients with severe asthma have a significant degree of cough-related morbidity that appears independent of eosinophilic airway inflammation and is not captured fully by existing asthma patient-reported outcome instruments. Our preliminary findings suggest that further research is now required to validate the LCQ and its responsiveness in severe asthma populations to capture cough-related morbidity and response to specific interventions.
DOI Link: 10.1186/s12931-017-0520-2
ISSN: 1465-9921
eISSN: 1465-993X
Links: http://respiratory-research.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12931-017-0520-2
http://hdl.handle.net/2381/39490
Version: Publisher Version
Status: Peer-reviewed
Type: Journal Article
Rights: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Description: The datasets during and/or analysed during the current study available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, Dept. of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation

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