Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/39936
Title: Withdrawal of antihypertensive medication: a systematic review.
Authors: van der Wardt, Veronika
Harrison, Jennifer K.
Welsh, Tomas
Conroy, Simon
Gladman, John
First Published: 9-May-2017
Publisher: Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.
Citation: Journal of Hypertension, 2017, 35:000–000
Abstract: Although antihypertensive medication is usually continued indefinitely, observations during wash-out phases in hypertension trials have shown that withdrawal of antihypertensive medication might be well tolerated to do in a considerable proportion of people. A systematic review was completed to determine the proportion of people remaining normotensive for 6 months or longer after cessation of antihypertensive therapy and to investigate the safety of withdrawal. The mean proportion adjusted for sample size of people remaining below each study’s threshold for hypertension treatment was 0.38 at 6 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37–0.49; 912 participants], 0.40 at 1 year (95% CI 0.40–0.40; 2640 participants) and 0.26 at 2 years or longer (95% CI 0.26–0.27; 1262 participants). Monotherapy, lower blood pressure before withdrawal and body weight were reported as predictors for successful withdrawal. Adverse events were more common in those who withdrew but were minor and included headache, joint pain, palpitations, oedema and a general feeling of being unwell. Prescribers should consider offering patients with well controlled hypertension a trial of withdrawal of antihypertensive treatment with subsequent regular blood pressure monitoring.
DOI Link: 10.1097/HJH.0000000000001405
ISSN: 0263-6352
eISSN: 1473-5598
Links: https://insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00004872-900000000-97726
http://hdl.handle.net/2381/39936
Version: Publisher Version
Status: Peer-reviewed
Type: Journal Article
Rights: Copyright © 2017 the authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, Dept. of Health Sciences

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