Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/39941
Title: Identifying adverse effects of area-based health policy: An ethnographic study of a deprived neighbourhood in England
Authors: Williams, Oli
First Published: 17-Mar-2017
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Health & Place, 2017, 45, pp. 85-91
Abstract: Health interventions commonly have adverse effects. Addressing these could significantly improve health outcomes. This paper addresses an adverse effect common in the promotion of health behaviours: exacerbation of health inequalities between low- and high-socioeconomic groups. Health behaviours – particularly, physical activity - are positioned within the context of social inequality and the inequitable spatial distribution of resources. Area-based health policy that targets deprived areas is assessed for its capacity to promote health behaviours without exacerbating inequality. Data are derived from a 16-month ethnography in a deprived English neighbourhood that was the target of area-based intervention that prioritised the promotion of physical activity. Findings provide evidence of adverse intervention effects that further disadvantaged the low-socioeconomic population. Analysis demonstrates how this was ultimately the outcome of localised policy drifting away from initial commitments to equitable service access. These findings increase understanding of the processes through which adverse intervention effects arise and how they can be mitigated.
DOI Link: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2017.02.011
ISSN: 1353-8292
eISSN: 1873-2054
Links: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1353829217302204
http://hdl.handle.net/2381/39941
Embargo on file until: 17-Sep-2018
Version: Post-print
Status: Peer-reviewed
Type: Journal Article
Rights: Crown Copyright © 2017 Published by Elsevier Ltd.
Description: The file associated with this record is under embargo until 18 months after publication, in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. The full text may be available through the publisher links provided above.
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, Dept. of Health Sciences

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