Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/40188
Title: Mannose-binding lectin-associated serine protease 2 (MASP-2) contributes to poor disease outcome in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis
Authors: Kasanmoentalib, E. Soemirien
Seron, Mercedes Valls
Ferwerda, Bart
Tanck, Michael W.
Zwinderman, Aeilko H.
Baas, Frank
van der Ende, Arie
Schwaeble, William J.
Brouwer, Matthijs C.
van de Beek, Diederik
First Published: 3-Jan-2017
Publisher: BioMed Central
Citation: Journal of Neuroinflammation, 2017, 14:2
Abstract: Background: Pneumococcal meningitis is the most common and severe form of bacterial meningitis. Fatality rates are substantial, and long-term sequelae develop in about half of survivors. Disease outcome has been related to the severity of the pro-inflammatory response in the subarachnoid space. The complement system, which mediates key inflammatory processes, has been implicated as a modulator of pneumococcal meningitis disease severity in animal studies. Methods: We investigated mannose-binding lectin-associated serine protease (MASP-2) levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples derived from the diagnostic lumbar puncture, which was available for 307 of 792 pneumococcal meningitis episodes included in our prospective nationwide cohort study (39%), and the association between these levels and clinical outcome. Subsequently, we studied the role of MASP-2 in our experimental pneumococcal meningitis mouse model using Masp2 −/− mice and evaluated the potential of adjuvant treatment with MASP-2-specific monoclonal antibodies in wild-type (WT) mice. Results: MASP-2 levels in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with bacterial meningitis were correlated with poor functional outcome. Consistent with these human data, Masp2-deficient mice with pneumococcal meningitis had lower cytokine levels and increased survival compared to WT mice. Adjuvant treatment with MASP-2-specific monoclonal antibodies led to reduced complement activation and decreased disease severity. Conclusions: MASP-2 contributes to poor disease outcome in human and mice with pneumococcal meningitis. MASP-2-specific monoclonal antibodies can be used to attenuate the inflammatory response in pneumococcal meningitis.
DOI Link: 10.1186/s12974-016-0770-9
ISSN: 1742-2094
eISSN: 1742-2094
Links: https://jneuroinflammation.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12974-016-0770-9
http://hdl.handle.net/2381/40188
Version: Publisher Version
Status: Peer-reviewed
Type: Journal Article
Rights: Copyright © the authors, 2016. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Description: An erratum to this paper has been published at http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12974-017-0857-y / http://hdl.handle.net/2381/40189.
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, Dept. of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation

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