Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/40193
Title: Experiencing risk: the effect of the experiential life-skills centre ‘Warning Zone’ on children’s risk perception
Authors: Boam, Soraya
Pulford, Briony D.
First Published: 12-Jul-2017
Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Citation: Journal of Risk Research, 2017, in press
Abstract: This study examined the psychological effects of the Warning Zone experiential life-skills centre on risk perception. The aim of Warning Zone is to educate children about dangers and risks they may encounter in everyday life, with a view to preventing injury. To evaluate changes in risk perception, a quasi-experimental study was undertaken in which children’s risk perception was measured before, after, and one month after the Warning Zone experience. This research also examined children from different types of schools, in order to assess socio-economic factors. Children’s risk perception increased significantly after Warning Zone, and this significant increase was retained one month later. Differential effects of Warning Zone were found between children from different school types, as were pre-existing differences in risk perception between these groups. Children from more deprived backgrounds had better understanding of risks prior to their visit to Warning Zone and a month later had better retained the message of Warning Zone about risks. We conclude that Warning Zone is effective at raising children’s perceptions of risk.
DOI Link: 10.1080/13669877.2017.1351481
ISSN: 1366-9877
eISSN: 1466-4461
Links: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13669877.2017.1351481
http://hdl.handle.net/2381/40193
Embargo on file until: 12-Jan-2019
Version: Post-print
Status: Peer-reviewed
Type: Journal Article
Rights: Copyright © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Deposited with reference to the publisher’s open access archiving policy.
Description: The file associated with this record is under embargo until 18 months after publication, in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. The full text may be available through the publisher links provided above.
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, Dept. of Neuroscience, Psychology and Behaviour

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Boam & Pulford manuscript 2017.pdfPost-review (final submitted author manuscript)370.76 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in LRA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.