Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/41635
Title: 'The great blow' and the politics of popular royalism in Civil-War Norwich
Authors: Hopper, Andrew
First Published: 28-Feb-2018
Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)
Citation: The English Historical Review, 2018, 133 (560), pp. 32-64 (32)
Abstract: This article explores popular politics and royalism during the English Civil Wars through the reaction of magistrates to the riot in Norwich on 24 April 1648 that was referred to by contemporaries as the ‘mutiny’ or the ‘Great Blow’. On the eve of the Second Civil War, this confrontation between urban rioters and New Model Army troopers led to the largest explosion of gunpowder in seventeenth-century England, when ninety-eight barrels were ignited at the Committee House. The article analyses the 281 witness statements that were produced as part of the judicial inquest, making this the best-documented provincial riot of the early modern period. These previously neglected proceedings can do much to advance our understanding of popular politics, royalism and urban culture. Therefore the article focuses on how the rioters mobilised and generated crowds through petitioning, subscription, print, preaching, rumour, health-drinking, seditious words, and gestures. It assesses participants’ social origins and places them within contrasting local religious and political cultures in a battle for control of the key public spaces of the city. The seditious words revealed in the depositions cannot be dismissed as merely anti-parliamentarian, and in many cases illuminate how a politics of popular royalism was revived in the city. The episode highlights how both national and local, and elite and popular politics overlapped and were entwined by civil war.
DOI Link: 10.1093/ehr/cey070
ISSN: 1477-4534
0013-8266
Links: https://academic.oup.com/ehr/article/133/560/32/4913829
http://hdl.handle.net/2381/41635
Embargo on file until: 28-Feb-2020
Version: Post-print
Status: Peer-reviewed
Type: Journal Article
Rights: Copyright © 2018, Oxford University Press (OUP). Deposited with reference to the publisher’s open access archiving policy. (http://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved)
Description: The file associated with this record is under embargo until 24 months after publication, in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. The full text may be available through the publisher links provided above.
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, School of Historical Studies

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Hopper+Tables+1+and+2+FINAL.pdfPost-review (final submitted author manuscript)105.55 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
Hopper+Table+3+FINAL.pdfPost-review (final submitted author manuscript)77.9 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
Hopper+FINAL.pdfPost-review (final submitted author manuscript)499.47 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
Hopper+captions+and+running+head.pdfPost-review (final submitted author manuscript)74.98 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
Hopper+abstract+FINAL.pdfPost-review (final submitted author manuscript)98.96 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in LRA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.