Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/43957
Title: Representing anxious parents in China: a study of ‘Parenting Science’ magazine 1980-2016
Authors: Gong, Q
First Published: 2019
Publisher: SAGE Publications (UK and US)
Citation: European Journal of Cultural Studies, 2019, In Press
Abstract: This paper analyses the representation of parental practices in Parenting Science, the first and longest running parenting magazine published in China since 1980. Drawing on Foucault’s work on governmentality and biopolitics as well as their current development in cultural studies and sociology of health, this paper critically investigates the cultural frames that surround parental practices relating to the health and development of young children. It explores how issues of medicalisation, intensive parenting, responsibility and selfmanagement are represented in the magazine, ‘reflecting’ as well as ‘reinforcing’ dominant cultural ideas of parenting and childrearing in China. Based on a qualitative content analysis of 2,295 items from 37 issues of the magazine (1980-2016), including editorials, feature stories, standard articles, Q&As, adverts and other short items, this paper has identified three major frames of parental practices in monitoring and facilitating children’s health, development and wellbeing: 1) the medicalisation of children’s health problems, 2) the rise of expert authority, 3) and the responsibilisation of parents. This paper argues that these frames underpin the construction of an intensive and anxious parenting culture in China and serve as powerful tools of biopolitical control.
DOI Link: TBA
ISSN: 1367-5494
Links: TBA
http://hdl.handle.net/2381/43957
Embargo on file until: 1-Jan-10000
Version: Post-print
Status: Peer-reviewed
Type: Journal Article
Rights: Copyright © 2019, SAGE Publications (UK and US) . Deposited with reference to the publisher’s open access archiving policy. (http://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved)
Description: The file associated with this record is under embargo until publication, in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. The full text may be available through the publisher links provided above.
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, Dept. of Sociology

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