Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/44931
Title: Older adults make greater use of word predictability in Chinese reading
Authors: Zhao, S
Lin, L
Chang, M
Xu, Q
Zhang, K
Wang, J
Paterson, K
First Published: 2019
Publisher: American Psychological Association
Citation: Psychology and Aging, 2019, In Press
Abstract: An influential account of normative aging effects on reading holds that older adults make greater use of contextual predictability to facilitate word identification. However, supporting evidence is scarce. Accordingly, we used measures of eye movements to experimentally investigate age differences in word predictability effects in Chinese reading, as this non-alphabetic language has characteristics that may promote such effects. Wordskipping rates were higher and reading times lower for more highly predictable words for both age groups. Effects of word predictability on word-skipping did not differ across the two adult age groups. However, word predictability effects in reading time measures sensitive to both lexical identification (i.e., gaze duration) and contextual integration (i.e., regression-path reading times) were larger for the older than younger adults. Our findings therefore reveal that older Chinese readers make greater use of a word’s predictability to facilitate both its lexical identification and integration with the prior sentence context.
DOI Link: TBA 10.1037/pag0000382
ISSN: 1939-1498
Links: TBA
http://hdl.handle.net/2381/44931
Embargo on file until: 1-Jan-10000
Version: Post-print
Status: Peer-reviewed
Type: Journal Article
Rights: Copyright © 2019, American Psychological Association. Deposited with reference to the publisher’s open access archiving policy. (http://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved)
Description: Data files and related resources are available from the University of Leicester online Figshare repository: https://leicester.figshare.com/s/f64ad508829abb339376
The file associated with this record is under embargo until publication, in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. The full text may be available through the publisher links provided above.
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, Dept. of Neuroscience, Psychology and Behaviour

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