Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/45510
Title: Nutritional Quality of Lunches Served in South East England Hospital Staff Canteens.
Authors: Jaworowska, Agnieszka
Rotaru, Gabriela
Christides, Tatiana
First Published: 1-Dec-2018
Publisher: MDPI
Citation: Nutrients, 2018, 10(12), 1843
Abstract: Worksite canteens generally are characterized by obesogenic environments, which offer access to energy-dense foods and sugar-sweetened beverages rather than nutrient-rich food. This study assessed the nutritional quality of hot lunches offered in National Health Service (NHS) hospital staff canteens: 35 side dishes and 112 meals were purchased from 8 NHS hospital staff canteens. The meals were analyzed for portion size, energy, protein, total fat, saturated fatty acids (SFAs), salt, and the sodium to potassium ratio. The vegetarian and meat-based lunch meals served in the hospital staff canteens tended to be high in energy, total fat, saturated fatty acids, and salt: 40%, 59% and 67% of meat meals and 34%, 43%, and 80% of vegetarian meals were assigned the red traffic light label for total fat, salt, and SFAs per portion, respectively. Similar types of meals, but served in different hospitals, varied considerably in their nutritional quality. The consumption of some lunch meals could provide more than 50% of recommended total fat, SFAs, and salt for both men and women and daily energy for women. The majority of analyzed lunch meals were characterized by an unfavorable nutrient profile, and regular consumption of such meals may increase the risk of noncommunicable diseases.
DOI Link: 10.3390/nu10121843
eISSN: 2072-6643
Links: https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/10/12/1843
http://hdl.handle.net/2381/45510
Version: Publisher Version
Status: Peer-reviewed
Type: Journal Article
Rights: Copyright © the authors, 2018. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, College of Medicine, Biological Sciences and Psychology

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