Leicester Research Archive

Leicester Research Archive >
College of Medicine, Biological Sciences and Psychology >
Psychology, School of >
Published Articles, School of Psychology >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/8870

Title: The dark triad and normal personality traits
Authors: Jakobwitz, Sharon
Egan, Vincent
Issue Date: 8-Sep-2005
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Personality and Individual Differences, 2006, 40 (2), pp. 331-339
Abstract: Machiavellianism, Narcissism and Psychopathy are often referred to as the ‘dark triad’ of personality. We examined the degree to which these constructs could be identified in 82 persons recruited from the general population, predicting that the dark triad would emerge as a single dimension denoting the cardinal interpersonal elements of primary psychopathy. We expected the primary psychopathy dimension to correlate negatively with Agreeableness (A) and Conscientiousness (C), whereas secondary psychopathy would be associated with Neuroticism (N). The negative correlation was found between primary psychopathy and A, but not with C. While the predicted correlation between secondary psychopathy and N was found, N was also positively associated with primary psychopathy and Machiavellianism. Factor analysis revealed that all measures of the dark triad loaded positively on the same factor, upon which A loaded negatively. Secondary psychopathy loaded positively on a second factor, together with N and (negatively) with C. These findings reiterate the distinguishing properties of secondary psychopathy, impulsivity and anti-social behaviour relative to primary psychopathy. Thus, even in the general population, the dark dimension of personality can be described in terms of low A, whereas much of the anti-social behaviour in normal persons appears underpinned by high N and low C.
ISSN: 0191-8869
Links: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal&(...)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2005.07.006
http://hdl.handle.net/2381/8870
Type: Article
Description: Full text of this item is not currently available on the LRA. The final published version is available at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/01918869, Doi: 10.1016/j.paid.2005.07.006.
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, School of Psychology

Files in This Item:

There are no files associated with this item.

View Statistics

Items in LRA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

MAINTAINER