Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/939
Title: Prognosis for South Asian and white patients newly admitted to hospital with heart failure in the UK: historical cohort study
Authors: Blackledge, Hanna M.
Newton, James
Squire, Iain B.
First Published: 4-Sep-2003
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
Citation: British Medical Journal, 2003, 327, pp.526-531
Abstract: Objectives: To compare patterns of admission to hospital and prognosis in white and South Asian patients newly admitted with heart failure, and to evaluate the effect of personal characteristics and comorbidity on outcome. Design: Historical cohort study. Setting: UK district health authority (population 960 000). Participants: 5789 consecutive patients newly admitted with heart failure. Main outcome measures: Population admission rates, incidence rates for first admission with heart failure, survival, and readmission rates. Results: When compared with the white population, South Asian patients had significantly higher age adjusted admission rates (rate ratio 3.8 for men and 5.2 for women) and hospital incidence rates (2.2 and 2.9). Among 5789 incident cases of heart failure, South Asian patients were younger and more often male than white patients (70 (SD 0.6) v 78 (SD 0.1) years and 56.5% (190/336) v 49.3% (2494/5057)). South Asian patients were also more likely to have previous myocardial infarction (10.1% (n = 34) v 5.5% (n = 278)) or concomitant myocardial infarction (18.8% (n = 63) v 10.7% (n = 539)) or diabetes (45.8% (n = 154) v 16.2% (n = 817), all P < 0.001). A trend was shown to longer unadjusted survival for both sexes among South Asian patients. After adjustment for covariables, South Asian patients had a significantly lower risk of death (hazard ratio 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.68 to 0.99) and a similar probability of death or readmission (0.96, 0.81 to 1.09) compared with white patients. Conclusions: Population admission rates for heart failure are higher among South Asian patients than white patients in Leicestershire. At first admission South Asian patients were younger and more often had concomitant diabetes or acute ischaemic heart disease than white patients. Despite major differences in personal characteristics and risk factors between white and South Asian patients, outcome was similar, if not better, in South Asian patients.
DOI Link: 10.1136/bmj.327.7414.526
ISSN: 0959-8138
Links: http://hdl.handle.net/2381/939
http://www.bmj.com/content/327/7414/526
Version: Publisher Version
Status: Peer-reviewed
Type: Article
Rights: Copyright © the authors, 2003. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium non-commercially, provided the original author and source are credited.
Appears in Collections:Published Articles, Dept. of Cardiovascular Sciences

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